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What do teachers teach? English 100 Course Descriptions

Every instructor chooses specific topics for discussion in English 100; scroll down and discover what topics teachers teach.

Not all instructors teach every semester; check the "Schedule of Classes" first to identify who is teaching that semester, then read the course description here.

Baer W.-"Elements of Writing"

Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

Bañales V.- ACE Learning Community-Social Justice Cohort

Welcome to English 100/255, a unique course designed for the ACE program that combines two English levels, giving English 255 students the chance to “accelerate” along with their English 100 peers!  While acceleration may not be for all students, you will nonetheless have the opportunity to take a rigorous, academic English course taught at the “100” level, all the while receiving the necessary support for you to succeed at either English level.  During the semester, your English course will explore various themes that intersect with and link up to Academy’s overarching social justice research curriculum.  Therefore, students will be introduced to a range of articles that thematize topics pertaining to power, privilege, and prejudice.  Some themes include: racial profiling, sexual violence, labor inequalities, immigration, the criminal justice system, and more.  In addition, we will read Jamaica Kincaid’s full-length book, A Small Place, and in doing so, take a literary and historical “tour” through the Caribbean as we critically analyze the impacts of colonialism, global capitalism, tourism, and travel in the developing world.   So grab a seat, put on your seatbelt, and get ready for a fast-paced albeit fun English experience!

Bloom B.-"The Open Road"

In this class we’ll look at travel-themed essays and a non-fiction book about an amazing travel adventure as we reflect in essays and discussion on what we find when we step outside our comfort zone. What do we learn about ourselves?  And what do we learn about home when we step away from it?  Since writing is also a form of setting off into the unknown, we’ll have Natalie Goldberg’s Writing Down the Bones as a trusty guide.  Your pens, notebooks and your curious minds will be your passports!

Bummer A.-"Elements of Writing"

Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

Carney-Waddy S.-"Elements of Writing"

Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

Carter J.- ACE Learning Community -
“Imagining the Future: Speculative Fiction and Social Justice”

Our English class will focus on social justice issues including the prison system, the war on drugs, homelessness, the uses and abuses of genetics, and the disappearance of privacy in the internet age. The premise of this class is that to create a better and more just world we must first be able to imagine a world different from the one we live in. What future do you see for our world? Will it be a world of justice and liberty or a world where people are exploited and do not reach their full potential? We will explore this idea of social justice and the imagination in documentaries and essays about the world we live in as well as in speculative fiction films and stories. As a composition course, students will write both in-class and out-of-class essays, learn the basics of grammar and usage, and work on the study skills necessary to be a successful college student.

Conard K.-"Elements of Writing"

Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

Chaffin C.-"Elements of Writing"

This pre-transfer level writing course focuses on how writers employ personal life stories to shape critique of social and political circumstances. In preparation for transfer-level college courses that require academic papers, we examine the ways in which writers use language and thought to convey ideas for social change through exploring the material of their lives. You will compose a personal narrative that examines an experience you had that may have larger social and, even, political implications. In our textbook, Patterns, you will read works by Sandra Cisneros, Malcolm X, Sherman Alexie, and Bonnie Smith-Yackel. We will read Thomas Jefferson, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Martin Luther King.

Dayharsh G.-"Elements of Writing"

Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

Founds K.-"The Myth of Redemptive Violence & Non-Violent Social Change"

This course confronts the human desire to seek vengeance with examples of creative non-violence. We will critically examine texts and films through in-class discussion and debate. Students will hone their writing skills through journal entries, argument essays, and personal essays.  We will read Tattoos on the Heart, a memoir by Father Gregory Boyle that tells the story of Homeboy Industries (motto:  “Nothing stops a bullet like a job”), a job placement program for former gang members. We will watch the documentary The Interrupters, about a group of former gang members who interrupt violence on the streets of Chicago. Next, we will read Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide, a book about challenges facing women in the developing world. We will then explore Medea, a searing Greek tragedy about a sorceress so bent on vengeance that she is willing to sacrifice the lives of her beloved sons. Finally, we wil read Lysistrata, a ribald Greek about an Athenian woman who organizes a sex strike to protest the Peloponnesian Wars. We will also view the documentary Pray the Devil Back to Hell, about a group of Liberian women who use creative non-violence (including a sex strike) to bring an end to the Second Liberian Civil War in 2003.

Gonzalez J.-"Elements of Writing"

Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

Graecyn L.- “Eating English”

Food will lead us to topics as important and diverse as immigration; the environment; race, class, and gender;
social justice, oil dependency; health care; our eelationships with animals, and how our food choices both reflect our culture and profoundly affect our world. I hope this class will interest, challenge, inspire, and empower you as we read, watch, discuss, and think about eopic to produce passionate "essays demonstrating sustained clarity of intention,awareness of audience, and a variety of writing techniques." Please visit our class website to learn more:  http://www.cabrillo.edu/~lgraecyn/index.html

Isaacson J.-"Elements of Writing"

Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

Jones C.-"Elements of Writing"

Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

Jonker K.- ACE Learning Community -
"Ignorance and Bliss: Social Responses to Intelligence"

This is an English course designed to be part of an ACE cohort. You will conduct intensive reading (think quality not quantity) and extensive writing to demonstrate that you’ve reached college-level interpretive analysis, critical thinking, and writing sophistication. This will be assessed in a term-end portfolio adjudicated by members of the English Department.

Leal J.-"Writing the Self and Change"

In this course, students learn to write essays in various rhetorical modes and in the process generate the necessary material to fulfill the portfolio requirements.  Students begin by writing narratives essays that emphasize plot development, point-of-view, place, time, description, and conflict resolution.  In “writing the self,” students are encouraged to take create journeys into the glory of the past and generate entertaining stories that teach and delight readers.  What makes a story good?  Why do humans have to tell stories?  After the narrative essays, students transition to expository writing and craft argumentative/persuasive essays that emphasize thesis sentence development, topic and transitional sentences for paragraphs, use of facts, personal observation and/or experience , quoting secondary sources, and locating a logical conclusion, among other important expository concepts.  What social issues are you most concerned about?  The high cost of education?  The Civil Rights of migrant workers?  All of the out-of-class essays are rewritten for possible inclusion into the final portfolio.  Throughout the semester, students write in-class timed essays on specific reading assignments.  The narrative, argumentative/persuasive, and in-class timed essay assignments provide students with non-threatening opportunities to learn more about effective grammar usage, punctuation, and syntax.   This course utilizes writing workshops and peer response activities to learn more about audience, and at the end of the semester, students will be asked to submit a portfolio that fulfills specific course requirements.   Welcome!

Marshall T.--"Current Social Issues & Your Life Experience"

This course will strengthen your skills for writing both in and out of college. It will focus on perfecting your ability to build an academic-style essay with a clear point. We will work through five different modes of writing: description, narration, exemplification, process analysis, and critical response. You will be reading selections from several current scholars’ books on contemporary issues to learn about the elements of each rhetorical mode and how to use them for your purposes. You will then be given assignments to write about things from your own experience and thinking that will allow you to employ these elements. We will do exercises to supplement your 100L workbook efforts with further study of grammar and punctuation by using the Rules for Writers book.

Martin T.- "Elements of Writing"

This course will develop your skills and confidence in writing critically about yourself and the world around you. You will be introduced to the basics of reading and writing at the college level through actively responding to short readings, videos, your peers' and your own writing. We will discuss many topics and respectfully discuss our similarities and our differences. You will come to better understand the expectations of academic writing, as well as how to navigate college. Finally, it is this class' mission to empower each of you to feel confident about what you have to say and how you express that verbally, in writing, and through digital media.

McCallum G.- “Confinement and Liberty: How Ideas and Places Hold Us Hostage or Set Us Free”

In this course we will read, discuss and write about how or why individuals are in prisons—real or imagined—and how many set themselves free. We will also look at “writing from confinement”—writers who have found their voices while in prison or because of some kind of prison.  We will also look at the power of the individual and the power of the group. As a class, we will interpret the information and values we have received from family, authority figures, peer groups, life experiences, macro and micro cultures (culture of origin, the larger culture, technology), and our upbringing in order to find out what might restrict us or contribute positively to our individuality and our own notions of confinement and liberty, courage and fear.

McGuire J.- "Writing Across the Curriculum: Impacts"

In this class we'll explore what impacts our family, local, and global spheres.   We'll cover the impacts of gender, culture, religion, abilities, risks and restrictions, the environment, and the search for happiness. We will do this through the overhead subjects of science, the humanities, history, psychology, the social sciences, and even some math thrown in for fun. We'll write about a variety of impacts as we improve our writing skills that will be useful for other classes and life beyond the classroom.

McLean K.-"Elements of Writing"

Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

Najarro A.- Puente Project- "US Latinidad"

The course theme centers on the Latino/a experience in the United States. We will read various articles, poems, short stories, and novels that express diverse perspectives on the US Latino experience. During class we will discuss the readings, the craft of effective writing, and college level composition. Every class session includes group work where you may be asked to share your writing. Supported online through Blackboard.

Najarro A.- STARS- "US Latinidad"

The course theme centers on the Latino/a experience in the United States. We will read various articles, poems, short stories, and novels that express diverse perspectives on the US Latino experience. During class we will discuss the readings, the craft of effective writing, and college level composition. Every class session includes group work where you may be asked to share your writing. Supported online through Blackboard.

Paul M.-"Elements of Writing"

Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

Pizzuli G.-"Elements of Writing"

English 100, Elements of Writing helps students develop skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents, including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words. Education, identity, and social justice are some of the topics included in this course.

Putnam D.-"Elements of Writing"

This class focuses on current events and the role of the media in shaping American culture. While studying how information is presented online, in print, on film and television, and through storytelling, students will develop the reading, note taking, and critical writing skills required at the college level. Topics are “ripped from the headlines,” and class materials encompass a range of different media from local to international sources.

Richey J.-"Elements of Writing"

Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

Scott-Curtis C.- ACE Learning Community-"Elements of Writing"

Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

Scott-Curtis C.- On-Line Sections-"Elements of Writing"

Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

Scott-Curtis L.- "Elements of Writing"

Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

Shank T.- "Elements of Writing"

English 100 will introduce and sharpen the writing and reading skills necessary to succeed in English 1A, 1B, and in a variety of college-level writing settings and scenarios.  Not only will this course will introduce the fundamentals of essay writing, but it will also develop the ability to understand language and life like a writer. As we work to develop this understanding, we will place a great emphasis on you, your experiences, views, hopes, dreams, expectations, fears, and joys. We will be looking for meaning in these experiences and learning methods to articulate them. This course requires a mind that is ready to take some risks, exploring how you think and feel about a variety of topics, looking with new eyes. I strongly believe that writing is a process of discovery, and I have structured this class in such a way that we are constantly looking for-and articulating-that which is new, fresh, and interesting.

Sheftman D.- "Elements of Writing"- Emphasis on Criminal Justice

For Criminal Justice majors and those interested. Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

Simon L.- Early Childhood Education Section-"Elements of Writing"

Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

Sullivan D.-"Elements of Writing"

Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

Young D.-"Elements of Writing"

Develops skills in writing a variety of academic and professional documents,including personal narratives, analytical essays, reports, and persuasive prose; students read and discuss prose models, complete timed writings, and prepare portfolios of written work. Students write, revise, and edit a minimum of 6,000 words.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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