English 2

Summer 2016 Syllabus

Jefferson Hancock, Instructor

Office Hour: Monday-Friday online, by arrangement

Phone: (831) 477-5638

E-mail: jehancoc@cabrillo.edu

Course Description

English 2, Composition and Critical Thinking, focuses on expository and research writing, analytical reading, and critical thinking. Students write 6,000-8000 words.

The course emphasizes analytical writing across the disciplines and critical reading and viewing of complex and influential texts and films. Readings include non-fiction essay assignments that are substantially longer and more complex than those in the pre-requisite courses.


Preparation

Mr. Hancock assumes that students entering English 2 have familiarity with grammatical conventions of English, theories of essay writing, and research techniques. Ideally, students should have completed English 1A and are, thus, familiar with research strategies and MLA format.


Learning Outcomes

  • Write research and expository essays that synthesize critical analysis, intensive reading, and rhetorical writing strategies.
  • Evaluate arguments according to their perspectives and their contexts in non-fiction articles and secondary resources.

Course Objectives

  • Understand major theories of critical thinking.
  • Read and critically analyze literary selections and evaluate the arguments therein.
  • Develop decision making strategies and individual point of view using critical thinking theory.
  • Apply theories of critical thinking in essay writing.
  • Demonstrate command of critical thinking strategies in written examination.

Required Texts


Required Viewing

  • High Noon (1952) directed by Fred Zinneman
  • V for Vendetta (2006) directed by James McTeigue
  • An Inconvenient Truth (2006) with Al Gore

English 2 Assignments

  • Four (4) essays (1000-1500 words, roughly four to five double-spaced pages each, 150 points each, 600 points total, 60% of grade).
  • One (1) longer essay (1500-2000 words, eight to ten double-spaced pages, 200 points, 20% of grade)
  • Chapter Exercises from Asking the Right Questions (11 exercises @ 10 points each = 110 points)
  • Discussion Postings (4 postings per week, 4 points per posting, 16 points per week @ 5 weeks = 80 points)
  • Instructor Contact: Weekly check-in with instructor (2 points per week @ 5 weeks = 10 points)
  • Readings from textbooks and online assigned according to schedule. Essay assignments are based on readings.

English 2 Grading

By the end of the semester, 1000 points are possible.

900-1000 points = A

800-899 points = B

700-799 points = C

600-699 points = D

000-599 points = F


An A Student

  • Logs in 4-5 times per week
  • Submits assignments on time
  • Participates in class discussions with detailed and thoughtful postings
  • Demonstrates exemplary knowledge of readings essays and discussion
  • Demonstrates exemplary knowledge of critical thinking concepts in essays and exercises

A B Student

  • Logs in 4-5 times per week
  • Submits all assignments on time
  • Participates in most class discussions with detailed and thoughtful postings
  • Demonstrates firm knowledge of readings in essays and discussion
  • Demonstrates firm knowledge of critical thinking concepts in essays and exercises.

A C Student

  • Logs in 3-4 times per week
  • Submits all assignments
  • Participates in some class discussions
  • Completes all essays and some exercises
  • Demonstrates fundamental knowledge of critical thinking concepts in essays and exams.

A D Student

  • Logs in 1-2 times per week or less
  • Seldom submits assignments or submits incomplete assignments
  • Seldom participates in class discussions and exercises
  • Demonstrates limited knowledge of readings in essays and exercises
  • Demonstrates limited knowledge of critical thinking concepts in essays and exercises

An F Student

  • Seldom logs in
  • Seldom submits assignments
  • Seldom participates in class discussions or exercises
  • Demonstrates no knowledge of readings in essays and exams
  • Demonstrates no knowledge of critical thinking concepts in essays and exams.

English 2 Essay Grading

Essays are graded based on the following criteria:

  • Demonstrated knowledge of critical thinking concepts. The essay has no logical fallacies and employs ideas discussed in lectures and readings.
  • Demonstrated knowledge of course readings. The essay may refer to readings as a means of discussion on the assigned topic.
  • Clarity and originality of thesis. The essay shows some thought on the topic and isn't just a summary of others' ideas.
  • Depth of paragraph development. The essay presents sufficient examples and evidence to support its main point.
  • Quality of examples and evidence. The essay presents credible evidence to support its main point according to guidelines established in lectures and readings. Such evidence is also germane to the author's thesis.
  • Clarity of sentences. The essay's sentences are easy to follow due to clear vocabulary and sentence structure.
  • Thoughtful analysis and demonstration of critical thinking concepts. The essay demonstrates consideration of multiple points of view while still holding to its thesis. The essay points out potential problems in its own point of view. The essay is free of logical fallacies.
  • Clarity and conciseness in writing style
  • Depth of research and analysis. The essay presents research which is appropriate and has been evaluated according to criteria established in course readings and lectures.
  • Correct use of MLA format
  • Unity, cohesiveness, organization, and transitions. The essay's argument is easy to follow and has ideas which are logically connected.

An A paper:

  • Has a clear and original thesis
  • Demonstrates clear understanding of critical thinking concepts
  • Presents the author's point of view but also considers alternative conclusions.
  • Demonstrates application of course readings
  • Has an introduction which evokes reader interest
  • Has a clear pattern of organization and logic
  • Has no logical fallacies
  • Has fully developed paragraphs
  • Provides clear evidence to support the author's thesis.
  • Has examples that effectively demonstrate the author's message.
  • Has a variety of research that effectively proves the author's intended point.
  • Has paragraphs with clear focus.
  • Uses transitions.
  • Has varied sentence structure
  • May use figurative language and metaphor
  • Is free of excess wordiness and passive voice.
  • Is free of errors in grammar, spelling, and mechanics

A B paper:

  • Has a clear thesis which may or may not be original.
  • Demonstrates clear understanding of critical thinking concepts but may need more analysis of the topic.
  • Presents the author's point of view and considers alternative conclusions, but may do so incompletely.
  • Demonstrates application of course readings, but may not provide sufficient detail in doing to.
  • Has an introduction which evokes reader interest
  • Has a clear pattern of organization and logic
  • Has no logical fallacies
  • Has fully developed paragraphs
  • Provides clear evidence to support the author's thesis, but such evidence may be incomplete in a few areas.
  • Has examples that effectively demonstrate the author's message but could benefit from more examples.
  • Has some research that effectively proves the author's intended point but that research may be limited in scope and variety.
  • Has paragraphs with clear focus.
  • Uses transitions.
  • Has varied sentence structure
  • May or may not use figurative language and metaphor
  • Is largely free of excess wordiness and passive voice.
  • May have a few minor errors in grammar, spelling, and mechanics

A C paper:

  • Has a clear and original thesis
  • Demonstrates basic understanding of critical thinking concepts
  • Does not consider alternative conclusions in sufficient detail.
  • Demonstrates basic understanding of course readings
  • May or may not have an introduction which evokes reader interest
  • May have some organizational or logical problems which interfere with clarity of argument.
  • May have a few logical fallacies
  • Has paragraphs which may or not be fully developed.
  • Provides enough evidence to support the author's thesis, but such evidence may also be incomplete in places.
  • Has few examples that effectively demonstrate the author's message.
  • Has enough research to complete the assignment, but such research may not effectively prove the author's intended point.
  • May have minor problems in paragraph focus.
  • Transitions may not always be clear.
  • Has limited variety in sentence structure and vocabulary.
  • Does not use figurative language and metaphor
  • May have problems with wordiness and excessive passive voice.
  • Has some errors in grammar, spelling, and mechanics which may occasionally interfere with clarity.

A D paper:

  • Has no discernible thesis or a thesis which is overly broad or unclear.
  • Demonstrates limited understanding of critical thinking concepts
  • Does not consider alternative conclusions.
  • Demonstrates limited understanding or misapplication of course readings
  • Has no introduction or an introduction which does not evoke reader interest
  • Has no clear pattern of organization or logic
  • Has numerous logical fallacies
  • Has incomplete paragraphs which are not fully developed.
  • Provides little or no evidence to support the author's thesis.
  • Has few or no examples that effectively demonstrate the author's message.
  • Has no research or incomplete research.
  • Lacks focus in paragraphs.
  • Uses no transitions.
  • Has rudimentary sentence structure and vocabulary
  • Uses no figurative language and metaphor
  • Has excess wordiness and passive voice.
  • Has errors in grammar, spelling, and mechanics which interfere with clarity.

An F paper:

  • Falls well short of the assignment requirements
  • May not be understandable due to excessive grammar mistakes and unclear sentences.
  • Was not submitted.

Discussion Scoring (per post)

4

Addresses assignment

Demonstrates knowledge of text, if appropriate

Refers to text if appropriate

Detailed response

 

3

Addresses assignment

Demonstrates knowledge of text, if appropriate

Refers to text if appropriate

Less detailed response than 4

 

2

Addresses assignment

Demonstrates knowledge of text, if appropriate

 

1

May or may not address assignment

Response may not be clear due to grammar and mechanics

 

0

Incomplete response

 


Practice Exercise Scoring

10

Addresses assignment

Demonstrates knowledge of chapter concepts

Detailed response

Free of grammar and spelling mistakes

 

9

Addresses assignment

Demonstrates knowledge of chapter concepts

Less detailed than 10

May have minor grammar and spelling mistakes

 

8

Addresses assignment

Demonstrates knowledge of chapter concepts

May need more detail

May have minor grammar and spelling mistakes

 

7

Addresses assignment

Demonstrates knowledge of chapter concepts

Grammar, spelling, or stylistic mistakes may interfere with meaning.

Lacks detail but contains enough to complete assignment

 

6

May or may not address assignment

Does not demonstrate knowledge of chapter concepts

Lacks detail

Grammar and spelling mistakes interfere with clarity

 

0-5

Incomplete response

Does not meet minimum requirements

Grammar and spelling mistakes interfere with clarity

 

English 2 Class Policies

Mr. Hancock's class policies revolve around those in the Student Responsibilities section of the college catalog. Cabrillo's web site states:

All students who register for classes at Cabrillo College have the responsibility of attending class regularly, completing assignments on time, doing their own work (not plagiarizing), and demonstrating respect for faculty, administration, staff, and all Cabrillo College community members. All Cabrillo College students have the responsibility of respecting the College campus, equipment, and materials and reporting abuse or vandalism of such to the proper authorities. All Cabrillo College students have the responsibility of demonstrating professional behavior and following the guidelines described in the Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook.

That said, Mr. Hancock's class policies are listed below. Please familiarize yourself with them.

  • Participate in class. When you don't participate, you miss important information. Excessive absence -- failure to log in regularly and submit assignments -- results in dismissal.
  • Communicate with your the instructor regularly via Cabrillo College e-mail
  • Turn in work on time. Late work receives a grade deduction or is not accepted.
  • No extra credit.
  • Please adhere to rules of public discourse. Be polite to your classmates and instructor. Mind your manners and refrain from profanity. Adhere to rules of online etiquette. Don't try to sell things and don't make rude comments on the discussion boards. Remember that anything you post has the potential to be seen by the world, so don't embarrass yourself. Think before you hit that "send" button.
  • Disruptive behavior will result in withdrawal from the course.

Plagiarism Policy

The following information comes from the Cabrillo College Website.

Plagiarism is the conscious or inadvertent failure to identify the contributions of others. It occurs when someone borrows any part of another's work and submits it, uncredited, as his or her own work. A failure to credit others may result in one or more of the following: a student receiving a failing grade on the assignment, a failing grade for the course, or suspension from college enrollment. Students are expected to know how to credit sources, how to quote and paraphrase, and how to avoid plagiarizing the work of others. If you are unsure, ask your instructor for assistance before you submit your work for credit.

In Mr. Hancock's class, the penalties for plagiarism are:

  • First offense = Grade of F (0 points) on assignment
  • Second offense = Grade of F in the course.

Accommodation for Disability

The instructor is happy to accommodate students with disabilities.  Students requesting accommodations should contact Mr. Hancock privately and should ensure that they have necessary documentation. To obtain necessary documentation, visit Accessibility Support Center (ASC) "The Hub" Learning Resources Center above the library.


Learning Resources Center

The Learning Resources Center is located above the library and houses the following assistive programs:

  • Learning Skills Program:  for students with Learning Disabilities or Attention Deficit Disorder.
  • Tutorials:  for those who need tutoring.
  • Writing Center : For extra help with essays