Michael G. Booth

Finance/Accounting

Fall 17

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College Accounting:




Objective and expected Outcome:


“In many cases, poverty results from a violation of the dignity of human work, either because work opportunities are limited (through unemployment or under employment), or because a low value is put on work and the rights that flow from it, especially the right to a just wage and to the personal security of the worker and his or her family.”
Laborem Exercens


As you embark on the learning required to master accounting and finance this semester, your challenge is to commit to acquiring the knowledge to create change in our world. To commit is to let go of the "small self: ego, the petty, self serving, self-interested,” so as to be the instrument of change, a steward of our planet earth and to give of self to your society.

On January 11, 1944, in the midst of World War II, President Roosevelt spoke forcefully and eloquently about the greater meaning and higher purpose of American security in a post-war America. The principles and ideas conveyed by FDR's words matter as much now as they did over sixty years ago.

“The Economic Bill of Rights”

Excerpt from President Roosevelt's January 11, 1944 message to the Congress of the United States on the State of the Union

"It is our duty now to begin to lay the plans and determine the strategy for the winning of a lasting peace and the establishment of an American standard of living higher than ever before known. We cannot be content, no matter how high that general standard of living may be, if some fraction of our people—whether it be one-third or one-fifth or one-tenth—is ill-fed, ill-clothed, ill-housed, and insecure.

This Republic had its beginning, and grew to its present strength, under the protection of certain inalienable political rights—among them the right of free speech, free press, free worship, trial by jury, freedom from unreasonable searches and seizures. They were our rights to life and liberty.

As our nation has grown in size and stature, however—as our industrial economy expanded—these political rights proved inadequate to assure us equality in the pursuit of happiness.

We have come to a clear realization of the fact that true individual freedom cannot exist without economic security and independence. “Necessitous men are not free men.” People who are hungry and out of a job are the stuff of which dictatorships are made.

In our day these economic truths have become accepted as self-evident. We have accepted, so to speak, a second Bill of Rights under which a new basis of security and prosperity can be established for all—regardless of station, race, or creed.

Among these are:

  • The right to a useful and remunerative job in the industries or shops or farms or mines of the nation;
  • The right to earn enough to provide adequate food and clothing and recreation;
  • The right of every farmer to raise and sell his products at a return which will give him and his family a decent living;
  • The right of every businessman, large and small, to trade in an atmosphere of freedom from unfair competition and domination by monopolies at home or abroad;
  • The right of every family to a decent home;
  • The right to adequate medical care and the opportunity to achieve and enjoy good health;
  • The right to adequate protection from the economic fears of old age, sickness, accident, and unemployment;
  • The right to a good education.
  • All of these rights spell security. And after this war is won we must be prepared to move forward, in the implementation of these rights, to new goals of human happiness and well-being.

America’s own rightful place in the world depends in large part upon how fully these and similar rights have been carried into practice for our citizens."

“Society depends for its existence on the inviolable personal solitude of its members. Society, to merit its name, must be made up not of numbers, or of mechanical units, but of persons. To be a person implies responsibility and freedom, and both these imply a certain interior solitude, a sense of personal integrity, a sense of one’s own reality and one’s ability to give himself to society” Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude, (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1981), p. 13

Over the next sixteen weeks the skills you will acquire in accounting and finance will give you the knowledge, courage, and awareness to take the critical first steps toward embracing your role as a steward for our world, and to act in society with integrity and competency. All three courses will emphasize sustainability, restoration, social responsibility, ethics, and how accounting and finance can play a critical role in this transformation. Each of these elements does not exist in a vacuum. All change starts with a first simple step, the individual, as do all decisions by the individual have a consequence on resulting outcomes.

Here is a video for you to consider, as you find your passion and path in the world:

The Lost Generation, Jonathan Reed


 

Instructor Welcome

Instructor Contact

Accounting 151A

Accounting 151A (Homework/Assessment)

Accounting 151A (Grading)

Accounting 1A

Accounting 1A (Homework/Assessment)

Accounting 1A (Grading)

Accounting 1A Corporations Final Project

Accounting 1B

Accounting 1B (Homework/Assessment)

Accounting 1B (Grading)

Calendar

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Today's Financial Accounting Tools.....

             For Socially Responsible and
                       Sustainable life tomorrow......

 

 

 

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