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Math 152 **INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA** Section 98882

Intermediate Algebra for College Students 6th edition 9780321758934 0321758935

 

Class Meets:   M & W: 11:10am-1:35pm; Rm 825                Units:     5.0 units
Prerequisite:  Math 154 or 154A/B with a grade of "C" of better or assessment test recommendation
Text:      
Intermediate Algebra for College Students, 6th Edition, by Blitzer ISBN: 9781269389426 (Cabrillo custom copy) or ISBN: 9780321758934 (non-custom copy). The custom copy textbook has a different cover, and a couple of sections that we won’t use from the book have been omitted, otherwise it’s the same as the “regular” textbook. This book has been in use for a while now so you can probably find an inexpensive used copy online.
Office Hours:  MTWTh: 1:35pm-2:20pm; and by appointment
Office:             Room 710          Phone/ Text:  (831)419-2204        E-mail:
    mabuchan@cabrillo.edu

Course Description:
This course continues development of algebra skills acquired in elementary algebra, which include the system of real numbers, polynomials, algebraic equations (linear, systems of linear, quadratic, and applications). The characteristics and properties of linear and quadratic functions are studied in detail, with an introduction to negative exponents, systems of linear equations in three variables, complex rational expressions, complex numbers, inverse, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, and non-linear systems. Problem-solving skills are developed to encourage students to use their basic knowledge of algebra to explore problems. May not be taken Pass/No Pass. May be offered in a Distance-Learning Format.

Student Learning Outcomes:
1. Evaluate appropriate techniques to apply to various types of equations and inequalities and produce and interpret solution(s).
2. Create, analyze, and solve a mathematical model describing a real life application.
3. Analyze and interpret mathematical and physical meaning from graphs of various functions.
4. Demonstrate algebraic literacy for subsequent math courses.

Student Learning Objectives:
1. Manipulate linear, polynomial, and rational expressions.
2. Solve linear, polynomial, and rational equations and interpret solution(s).
3. Recognize differences among systems of equations and inequalities and solve using various strategies.
4. Perform arithmetic operations between polynomials.
5. Use factoring as a problem-solving technique.
6. Identify functions and relations and interpret their graphs using an assortment of techniques.
7. Construct graphs from data, equations, or a combination of functions.
8. Manipulate radical, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic expressions.
9. Solve radical, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic equations.
10. Model a physical problem using algebraic functions and equations.
11. Find the inverse of a one-to-one function and recognize the inverse relationship through composition.

Supplies:
Some of the supplies you will need include a pencil, scientific calculator (phones, laptops, tablets, ipads, graphing calculators, etc… are NOT permitted on exams), notebook paper, access to the Internet, and printing capabilities. Color pencils and graph paper can be very helpful, but they are not required.

Attendance:
Attending all lectures and completing all assignments is essential for success in this course. Students are expected to attend all classes and labs. Late work will not be accepted and there will be no make-ups exams. Illness-related and other absences do not relieve students from the responsibility of obtaining material from missed lessons or turning in assignments. Students are encouraged to exchange phone numbers and form work groups with classmates or attend office hours to catch up.

Excessive absence from class, meaning more than 2 class meetings, can result in a student being dropped from the course. Students should not, however, assume that they will be dropped. It is the student's responsibility to officially drop a course using WebAdvisor online registration. If the instructor does drop the student from the class, there is no automatic refund or reversal of charges. Students who drop after “NRS” (No Record Shown) deadline will have a W recorded on his or her transcripts. Students may not drop after the “W” deadline.
"Refund" Deadline – Sat, Sept. 9th; "NRS" Deadline – Mon, Sept. 11th; "W" Deadline – Sat, Nov. 18th.

Homework:
Homework will be collected every day (except exam days) and graded for completeness, presentation, and correctness. You are assigned 26 sets of odd numbered problems (worth 4 points for each assignment), consisting of 2-3 chapter sections. You must show all of your work, and you are expected to check your answers in the back of book. Missing or putting off homework puts a hurdle between you and your success in the class. Late homework assignments will not be accepted. However, one homework set will be dropped at the end of the semester. 10% of Final Grade

Take Home Quizzes:
Take Home Quizzes will be collected every day (except exam days) and graded for completeness, presentation, and correctness. Take Home Quizzes are 8 random problems (4 problems from each section) that are to be printed from this website and completed (worth 1 point each problem). You must show all your work to receive full credit. Solutions to the Take Home Quizzes will be posted after they are collected and graded. You may work together with others on Take Home Quizzes, and you may get help from the MLC, ILC, office hours, etc. You must start early to take advantage of the resources available to you. I have assigned 26 Take Home Quizzes; however, one take home quiz will be dropped at the end of the semester. Late Take Home Quizzes will not be accepted.   20% of Final Grade

Exams:
There will be 3 Chapter Exams worth 150 points each. If you are unable to take an exam on the scheduled date, you may make arrangements to take it early, but you may NOT take an exam late. If you are forced to miss an exam you must call or email before the exam starts. If you miss an exam for a valid, verifiable reason, your final exam will be counted as 400 points instead of 250 points. A second missed exam will be counted as a zero. NO make-up exams will be given.   45% of Final Grade.

Final Exam:
A comprehensive 3-hour final exam contributing to 25% of Final Grade given on:

Monday, December 11th; 10:00am-12:50pm

 

Grades:       Grading Scale:
 

Homework

10%

(25 assignments @ 2 points each =    100 points)

  A: 100% - 90%

Take Home Quiz

20%

(25 quizzes @ 8 point each =  200 points)

  B: 89% - 80%

Exams

45%

(3 exams @ 150 points each =  450 points)

  C: 79% - 70%

Final Exam

25%

                                       250 points

  D: 69% - 60% 

Total

100%

                                    1000 points

  F: Below 60%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tutoring:
As a student in this Section of Math 152, it is recommended that you spend minimum of 2 hours actively engaged in assigned activities, for every hour spent in class. Tutoring is available in the MLC, in Aptos (Room 1074) (831) 477-5696, and the ILC, in Watsonville (Room A210) (831) 786-4755.

Student Honesty Policy:
Students are expected to exercise academic honesty and integrity. Violations such as cheating will result in disciplinary action which may include recommendation for dismissal.

Accommodations:
Students needing accommodations should contact me as soon as possible. As required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), accommodations are provided to insure equal opportunity for students with verified disabilities. If you need assistance with an accommodation, please contact the Accessibility Support Center (ASC), formerly Disabled Students Programs and Services (DSPS), 479-6379, or Learning Skills Program, Room 1073, 479-6220.

 

MATH 152 SCHEDULE FALL 2017

Wk

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

1

Aug-28

1.1: Algebraic Expressions, Real Numbers, and Interval Notation
1.4: Solving Linear Equations
1.5: Problem Solving and Using Formulas

Aug-29

 

Aug-30

1.6: Properties of Integral Exponents
1.7: Scientific Notation

Aug-31

 

Sept-1

2

Sept-4

No Class Labor Day

Sept-5

 

Sept-6

2.1: Introduction to Functions
2.2: Graphs of Functions

Sept-7

 

Sept-8

Refund & NRS Deadline

3

Sept-11

2.3: The Algebra of Functions
2.4: Linear Functions and Slope

Sept-12

 

Sept-13

2.5: The Point-Slope Form of the Equation of a Line
3.1: Systems of Linear Equations in Two Variables

Sept-14

 

Sept-15

4

Sept-18

3.2: Problem Solving and Business Applications Using Systems of Equations
3.3: Systems of Linear Equations in Three Variables

Sept-19

 

Sept-20

Class Canceled

Sept-21

 

Sept-22

5

Sept-25

4.1: Solving Linear Inequalities
4.2: Compound Inequalities
4.3: Equations and Inequalities Involving Absolute Value
4.4: Linear Inequalities in Two Variables

Sept-26

Sept-27

Exam 1
(Chapters 1-3)

Sept-28

Sept-29

6

Oct-2

5.1: Introduction to Polynomial and Polynomial Functions
5.2: Multiplication of Polynomials

Oct-3

Oct-4

5.3: Greatest Common Factors and Factoring by Grouping
5.4: Factoring Trinomials

Oct-5

Oct-6

7

Oct-9

5.5: Factoring Special Forms
5.6: A General Factoring Strategy

Oct-10

Oct-11

5.7: Polynomial Equations and Their Applications
6.1: Rational Expressions and Functions: Multiplying and Dividing

Oct-12

 

Oct-13

8

Oct-16

6.2: Adding and Subtracting Rational Expressions
6.3: Complex Rational Expressions

Oct-17

Oct-18

6.4: Division of Polynomials
6.6: Rational Equations

Oct-19

 

Oct-20

9

Oct-23

6.7: Formulas and Applications of Rational Equations

 

Oct-24

Oct-25

7.1: Radical Expressions and Functions
7.2: Rational Exponents

 

Oct-26

Oct-27

10

Oct-30

Exam 2
(Chapters 4-6)

Oct-31

Nov-1

7.3: Multiplying and Simplifying Radical Expressions
7.4: Adding, Subtracting, and Dividing Radical Expressions

Nov-2

Nov-3

11

Nov-6

7.5: Multiplying with More than One Term and Rationalizing Denominators
7.6: Radical Equations

Nov-7

 

Nov-8

7.7: Complex Numbers
8.1: The Square Root Property and Completing the Square

Nov-9

Nov-10

No Class Veterans Day

12

Nov-13

8.2:The Quadratic Formula
8.3: Quadratic Functions and Their Graphs

Nov-14

Nov-15

8.4: Equations Quadratic in Form
8.5: Polynomial and Rational Inequalities

Nov-16

 

Nov-17

 

W Deadline

13

Nov-20

9.1: Exponential Functions
9.2: Composite and Inverse Functions

Nov-21

Nov-22

9.3: Logarithmic Functions
9.4: Properties of Logarithms

Nov-23

No Class
Thanksgiving

Nov-24

No Class
Thanksgiving

14

Nov-27

9.5: Exponential and Logarithmic Equations
9.6: Exponential Growth and Decay; Modeling Data

Nov-28

Nov-29

10.1: Distance and Midpoint Formula; Circles
10.2: The Ellipse

Nov-30

Dec-1

15

Dec-4

Exam 3
(Chapters 7-9)

Dec-5

 

Dec-6

10.4: The Parabola; Identifying Conic Sections
10.5: Systems of Nonlinear Equations in Two Variables

Dec-7

Dec-8

16

Dec-11Final Exam
10:00am-12:50pm

Dec-12

Dec-1

Dec-14

Dec-15

 

MATH 152 HOMEWORK SCHEDULE

 

Hk#

Sect

Page

Problems

Due Date

 

1

1.1

12

1-13 odd, 27-33 odd, 49-77 odd

 

Aug 30

1.4

50

1-49 odd

1.5

65

1, 19, 21, 29, 31, 41, 43, 47, 49-73 odd

2

1.6

79

3-115 eoo

Sept 6

1.7

89

3-47 eoo, 49, 71, 72 (1.33x10^-19 gram)

3

2.1

111

1-7 odd, 9-17 eoo, 19-23 odd

Sept 11

2.2

121

11-37 odd

4

2.3

132

1-17 odd, 31-55 odd

Sept 13

2.4

150

17-25 odd, 29-47 odd, 83

5

2.5

162

1-25 eoo, 29-35 odd, 49-55 odd, 67

Sept 18

3.1

190

13-19 odd, 59-81 odd, 91, 97

6

3.2

204

11-31 odd

Sept 25

3.3

215

5-21 odd, 27, 41, 43

7

4.1

262

1-35 odd

Oct 2

4.2

271

7-31 odd, 39-53 odd

8

4.3

283

1-73 eoo

Oct 2

4.4

294

1-45 odd

9

5.1

323

1-9 eoo, 29-53 odd

Oct 4

5.2

337

1-89 eoo, 91-99 odd, 115

10

5.3

347

1-65 eoo, 67

Oct 9

5.4

361

1-37 eoo, 39-43 odd, 45-81 eoo, 83-91 odd

11

5.5

371

3-91 eoo, 107, 109

Oct 11

5.6

378

1-65 eoo, 81

12

5.7

390

1-45 eoo, 47-50 all, 65, 75, 76 (x=3), 78(x=3)

Oct 16

6.1

413

7-15 eoo, 19, 27-87 eoo

13

6.2

426

3-15 eoo, 29-65 eoo, 75, 85

Oct 18

6.3

435

1-37 eoo, 47

14

6.4

444

3-35 eoo, 37, 39

Oct 23

6.6

462

9-37 odd

15

6.7

475

1-13 eoo, 25-35 odd

Oct 25

16

7.1

511

1-25 eoo, 27-32 all, 35-87 eoo

Nov 1

7.2

521

3-111 eoo, 113

17

7.3

530

3-79 eoo

Nov 6

7.4

538

3-63 eoo

18

7.5

549

1-89 eoo

Nov 8

7.6

559

3-35 eoo, 43, 45

19

7.7

570

1-97 eoo

Nov 13

8.1

592

3-19 eoo, 37-57 eoo

20

8.2

607

1-17 eoo, 51-63 odd, 65, 67

Nov 15

8.3

625

1-8 all, 17-37 eoo, 57, 63

21

8.4

635

3-31 eoo, 33-37 odd

Nov 20

8.5

649

1-53 eoo

22

9.1

671

11-15 odd, 39, 41, 53, 59

Nov 22

9.2

686

1-13 eoo, 15-23 eoo, 27-43 eoo, 45-53 odd

23

9.3

700

1-41 eoo, 43-63 eoo, 67-71 odd

Nov 27

9.4

712

3-67 eoo, 81, 83

24

9.5

726

3-87 eoo, 99, 103

Nov 29

9.6

739

7, 15, 17, 19, 27, 29, 31

25

10.1

762

9-17 odd, 23-55 odd

Dec 6

10.2

775

7-33 odd, 43, 45

26

10.4

796

1-6 all, 19-39 eoo, 43-53 odd, 87

Dec 11

10.5

808

29-41 odd, 55, 57