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Leah M. Hlavaty
Phone: 831.479.6537
Email: Send a Message
Office Hours: M-F 8:00am - 5:00pm
Location: Library, 1015

Cabrillo Classified Employees Union (CCEU)Library


Leah M. Hlavaty
Library Associate

Tiger Food

A.S. Computer Applications & Office Systems (1997); A.A. Liberal Arts & Sciences (2010)
With Cabrillo College since 1993

CCEU Steward, Negotiations Team, Benefits Committee, Classification Study Committee

When I have a little money, I buy books. And if any is left, I buy food and clothing. ~Desiderius Erasmus

The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true. (Mundus Vult Decipi) ~James Branch Cabell

“We were talking about The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, in which there was something which resembled an iPad, long before it appeared. And I said when something like that happens, it’s going to be the death of the book. Douglas said no. Books are sharks,” Gaiman told a packed audience at the Royal Geographical Society in London.
“I must have looked baffled because he he looked very pleased with himself. And he carried on with his metaphor. Books are sharks … because sharks have been around for a very long time. There were sharks before there were dinosaurs, and the reason sharks are still in the ocean is that nothing is better at being a shark than a shark.”
Adams told Gaiman: “‘Look at a book. A book is the right size to be a book. They’re solar-powered. If you drop them, they keep on being a book. You can find your place in microseconds. Books are really good at being books and no matter what happens books will survive.’ And he was right,” said Gaiman.

I wonder... why I keep so many books that I know I will not read again. I tell myself that, every time I get rid of a book, I find a few days later that this is precisely the book I'm looking for. I tell myself that there are no books (or very, very few) in which I have found nothing at all to interest me. I tell myself that I've brought them into my house for a reason in the first place, and that this reason may hold good again in the future. I invoke excuses of thoroughness, of scarcity, of faint scholarship. But I know that the main reason I hold onto this ever-increasing hoard is a sort of voluptuous greed. I enjoy the sight of my crowded bookshelves, full of more or less familiar names. I delight in knowing that I'm surrounded by a sort of inventory of my life, with intimations of my future. I like discovering, in almost forgotten volumes, traces of the reader I once was ? scribbles, bus tickets, scraps of paper with mysterious names and numbers, the occasional date and place on the book's flyleaf which take me back to a certain cafe, a distant hotel room, a faraway summer so long ago. I could, if I had to, abandon these books of mine and begin again, somewhere else; I have done so before, several times, out of necessity. But then I have also had to acknowledge a grave, irreparable loss. I know that something dies when I give up my books, and that my memory keeps going back to them with mournful nostalgia. ~Alberto Manuel, A History of Reading

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